About your Search

20121001
20121031
STATION
CSPAN2 10
WHUT (Howard University Television) 9
KQED (PBS) 5
WETA 4
CSPAN 3
CNN 2
CNNW 2
WMPT (PBS) 2
KRCB (PBS) 1
MSNBC 1
MSNBCW 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 41
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)
him is that he was the principal, secret negotiator of the israel/jordan peace treaty, and it's easy to forget that, that role, but it is important to understand how crucial that peace treaty is now as the region is so volatile. there's a bit of good news today, i'm told the new egyptian ambassador to israel came today to announce that israel -- that egypt will abide by the peace treaty, will abide by the peace treaty with israel, but we have relied on the peace treaty, israel has relied on it, and so have we, for many years. as haleh said, we watch developments in the middle east very closely here. the president of yemen came a few weeks ago to speak about a way forward for his country which is trying hard to become a strong ally in the fight against terrorism and has huge economic challenges. we just held the second of three meetings on how women are faring in the arab awakening. last month a former deputy secretary of state and ambassador tom pickering and other senior national security officials, military officers and experts with decades of middle east experience presented a rep
goes on, the greater the danger to international peace and security. >> in jordan, like turkey, more and more assyrian refugees are arriving, reinforcing a sinking pealing in the region that the crisis is spreading. diplomacy has not stopped the war and now is struggling even to content. >> no one wants an escalation lease area, but might it happen anyway? turning to the presidential debate, it was seen for a make or break moment format romney as he struggled to connect with voters on the campaign trail at unpunished in recent opinion polls. barack obama, polls suggested romney had come out on top. many commentators said he dominated the debate while obama lacked energy. we have this report. >> in a country is fraught with a bitter political divisions, and there is a rare moment of agreement. >> from mitt romney outshines president obama in the first date. >> the consensus of the american media -- mitt was the hit. president didn't seem to want to let go. he started with a standard campaign like -- is but it would cut taxes for the wealthy and hurt the middle-class. >> that kind of t
and jordan river, a state connected by a highly developed infrastructure of roads and water pipelines. i'm not sure when the point of return was passed, seven years ago, my first visit to israel, it was plausible to speak of the palestinian state. now did -- now it does not. a democratic process, appointment of envoys searching for commonground, building on previous agreements like those arrived at under the prime minister don't have chance of success. there's no political majority in israel in favor of withdrawing from the territory and settlements israel would have to do to allow a genuinely economically viable palestinian state. benjamin netanyahu gave lip service to the idea, but people close to him said he would never offer the palestinians something he could accept. the west bank, areas a and b, cut off from the world without control of the air space, their water will not produce a viable state. what can the next president do to change this? the only intervention that could shake israel out of the current spiral would be if a president made clear where the united states sees this h
wider war, with really serious consequences that for turkey and perhaps for jordan and saudi arabia and because of economic consequences for europe, so i am afraid that the word i tend to emphasize in ts context the prudence, rather than engagement. >> rose:. >> but i think i heard both candidates say they would not put -- it was ditches in terms of what kind of arms they might supply on the one hand communication equipment an on the other hand from -- light to heavy -- >> you can't start supplying weapons with someone without becoming tied to the consequences of that, that kind of detach. from the supply of arms and eventual engagement in the process, especially if the supply of arms creates tetation tospre that w. >> rose: what do you do about arms? >> i think you do have to know who those arms are going to, because it could come back and haunt you, obviously. >> rose: but can you control that? >> well, whether we do it or somebody else does it, you know, it is happening, so. >> rose: the arms are going in, you mean? >> but, you know, i just came back from the region also, mostly
into jordan and turkey. >>> you remember the five boys produced by the seniors in that family, five boys and he was one of them. he was studying dentistry in london. >> he has a brother maybe mort knows more about ita ruthless character. >> married, lovely wife right? >> yeah but people have given up on him as a quote reformer a long time ago. >> he is not a reformer. >> if there is any goodness left in the man, he has been directed by everybody else. >> if he goes down his people go down. john they go to the wall. they are 12%, sheer shiite, the sunni war? >> a sectarian civil war. >> if it is a civil war we are going to stay out. >> no we didn't stay out of libya. >> i think we are being pulled in. >> you think there is any sentiment in the united states to go into syria? >> not in the united states and i'm against it but we could get pulled in. the whole thing is spreading. the turks are going to be involved. >> the turks are not going to be involved. the president has spoken emfatly about that over there. >> they are involved right now. >> because of the penetration of a body border
as a capital is a nonstarter. there is now one state between the mediterranean and the jordan river, a state connected by highly-developed infrastructure of roads and water pipelines. i'm not sure when the point of return was passed. of seven years ago on my first visit to israel, it still seemed quite plausible to speak of a palestinian state. now it does not. so i believe any kind of normal diplomatic process -- appointment of a special envoy, searching for common ground, building on previous agreements such as those arrived at under prime minister olmert and prime minister barak -- don't have much chance of success. there's no political majority in israel in favor of withdrawing from the territory ask settlements israel would have to do to allow a genuinely economically-viable palestinian state. prime minister netanyahu, i know, has given lip service to the idea, but people close to him have said he would never offer the palestinians something he could accept. an archipelago stands on the west bank, areas a and b, cut off from the world without control of the air space, their water will n
ties with the sunni alignment of the sunni gulf states, egypt and jordan and the shia group of iran's syria and hezbollah was not easy especially as tension rose between the two groups. this was to be increasingly clear with the onset of the arab spring. when you look initially at russian concerns in the arab spring, it can spread to russia was efforts on the same problems as the arab states, autocratic government, widespread corruption and rising prices and indeed democracy demonstrators were shouting the revolutionary train stopped at the station in cairo, next stop moscow. the second concern, islam is my takeover and in a ending chaos and further inspire the islamists and north caucasus and increasingly and khe sanh as well. number three is oil and gas investments in the middle east could be jeopardized as well as the business and arms sales deals and number four when libya occurred, the russians i think that the major lesson purgative stained on the u.n. security council vote in the no-fly zone in bolivia thereby supporting the arab consensus and continuing the widened russian p
such as saudi arabia, uae and jordan, and in 2008 he added libya to the expanding arc of activity. putin's goals were fourfold. number one, demonstrate russia was again a major power in the middle east and the world. number two, gain -- for projects while selling sophisticated products like nuclear reactors and railway systems. number three, as the cost and difficulty of extracting russian oil and natural gas grew to gain joint ventures in oil and natural gas extraction with countries like saudi arabia, iran, uae, libya and iraq. and number four and certainly very important, to prevent the arab states from aiding the islamic resistance movements in the north caucuses that were beginning to spread through the rest of russia. but keeping good ties with the sunni alignment in egypt and jordan and the shia group of hezbollah was not easy, especially as tensions rose between the two groups. this was to be increasingly clear with the onset of the arab spring. now, when you look initially at russian concerns with the arab spring, a, it could spread to russia which suffered some of the same problems as
for a reason. this fire can quickly spread to turkey to jordan, to iraq. it is very dangerous. >> rose: may i ask this question, turning to another issue that is of great concern to the world, which is the success of negotiations between your government and the p-5 plus 1. where are you and do you believe there will be some success? >> we are hopeful that this will happen. this is why we are participating in the talks, in the negotiations. if there is no hope for success, then why would we even participate. however, we think that with technical and legal negotiations, we will not achieve anything. because our nuclear issue is not, is not legal and is not technical. you know about it because we have discussed it several times. >> rose: you believe it's a political question. >> yes t is clear t is clear that it's political. >> are you building a nuclear weapon? >> a nuclear weapon? for what, for what purpose, why would we do that? >> what would we use it for? >> you did not deny you are building a nuclear weapon. >> how many times should i repeat this opinions please, repeat it. please tell me
of jordan last month, we discussed the importance of continuing reforms to move his country toward more democracy and prosperity. so in all of these placings, and many others, the united states is helping the people of those nations chart their own destinies and realize the full measure of their own human dignity. dignity is a word that means many things to different people in cultures. but it does speak to something universal in all of us, as one egyptian observed in the wake of the country's revolution, freedom and dignity are more important than food and water when you eat in humiliation, you can't taste the food. but dignity does not come from avenging perceived insult especially with violence that can never be justified. it comes from taking responsibility for one's self and community. if you look around the world today, those countries focus on fostering growth ran grievance are pulling ahead. building schools instead of burning them, investment in the peoples' creativity not encouraging their rage. empowering women not excluding them. opening their economies and societies to more
. >> it is spreading already. it is spreading to lebanon and jordan. >> the husband of violence. -- there has not been of violence in lebanon. at the same time, there is so many other places where you could have a fire began. -- which i think the russians are, here. >> i agree that russia is unlikely to help us in the united states. we have tried three times in the u.n.. cotton three vetoes in return. best case, maybe i was in china a few months ago. talking about, maybe they should concentrate on domestic problems, rather than having a domestic -- rather than having an aggressive domestic foreign policy. it is a possibility. i would give you my worst case, and it may be unfolding before our eyes. nato has guarantee turkey's borders. in case, what happened in just a week ago flares up -- more shelling. remember when i said in my presentation. he decides -- nonetheless, he might escalate the conflict the russians will not intervene. they said they -- their treaty with syria is not going to guarantee russian aid. we could see a nice war opening up with my then dragged into russia with the iranians. then
shells land in lebanon and in jordan over the board frer syria and landed over the border inside turkey several times. now for the first time another country is going to shoot back. what's assad's response going to be to that? i don't see him pulling back. >> whose call would that have been to retaliate? >> that would come from the prime minister. the prime minister's got a lot of political baggage tied up in syria right now. a lot of people in turkey don't like the way he's really come out against assad, that he's got so many refugees in his country. and he wants to win another election. and he's got to come out tough on this one. >> talking to ivan watsson, he said the last thing turkey wants is to get dragged into a war. >> and look it's happening. this is what we're seeing right now. how far will it go depends on the amount of shelling. >> and five people were killed in turkey, correct? >> that's what we understand. a woman and several children. >> okay. so as we continue to watch, we'll watch reaction from nato also i presume. >> tur ks are turning to nato to. i don't think we can
working closely with it -- for some time with our partners. jordan has been taking an important role. as we have seen with the syrian regime's violations last week of turkish sovereignty, our partners in the region are greatly affected by assad's brutal campaign, so we will continue to coordinate closely with our partners moving forward as we have in the past. >> u.s. boots on the ground right next to a war zone -- is this an escalation? >> it is not an escalation. it is working with a partner to deal with the impacts of assad's brutality. >> as you know, many of the administration's critics would like to see a more active role by these troops. >> our position on providing military legal assistance has not changed. it is our position that what is needed in syria is not more weapons. what is needed is a political transition. you note critics who seem to support taking some sort of harder, more militaristic line, but they will not come forward and draw any real distinctions from what they are proposing compared to what the president is doing. if someone in congress or elsewhere wants t
israel in the map because it's so small. it's just below lebanon, just to the left of jordan. and one of the concerns, the reasons why assad may possibly want toe export this civil war o lebanon is because damascus has spoken at great lengthuct foreign fighters and weapons crossing the border from lebanon and other places as well like turkey, but from lebanon. if you embroil lebanon in the war, you change the dynamic. it's not just assad uprising at home. >> why this general? >> he was one of the top security chiefs in lebanon, and he uncovered a plot earlier this year which implicated a pro syrian minister within the lebanese government. he's accused of collaborating with members of the syrian government to import explosives and to launch attacks inside lebanon. he's been a thorn in syria's side for many, many years. so again, if he dies, if he's taken out by the syrian authorities, we're seeing it play out now. you see the tensions heighten. the protests already on the streets of lebanon today. those who want a stern response from the lebanese, the opposition, demanding that the leb
in the middle east which has deep implication for jordan, for turkey, israel, our great ally and friend and you hear none of that sensitivity from mitt romney. it's a complicated world out there and we need a president who understands those complications and has the experience of making decisions about them. >> final comment? >> this is the most inexperienced candidate for president and vice president together. >> a one term governor with no foreign policy experience. >> one term governor and congressman that's been dealing with the budget. neither of whom have ever made a real decision about sending troops into war or about going into war or have gone into war themselves. >> i have to ask you a question where i understand -- >> you just heard -- i don't know if that was a loose cable or something else but we just lost the tail end of that interview there. it was a live interview between lawrence o'donnell and john kerry. there has been a lot of discussion about if hillary clinton steps down, whether john kerry would be positioned to be a secretary of state. we're going to go live to chris matt
jordan in his monday speech. what he didn't talk about and that was a strategic partnership agreement that the administration has the go shade with the afghan government which will keep american soldiers in afghanistan until 2024. do you have a sense of what the minimum number of going forward? >> let me clarify a couple of things. there are more than a few administrative folks here who would say that was not the focal point on afghanistan. i was involved but i share the credit with many, many others who probably had more influence than i did. the first i would like to make about afghanistan and the big difference between mr. romney and mr. obama is that mr. obama said the deadline, period. i was in kabul in december of 2009 when mr. obama made that speech, and i was talking to isaf people, the people from the international force, you know the people who are out there getting shot at from other countries, not just our own. to a man and a woman, and there are women there, they have all almost took no notice of the surge statement. what they noticed was the deadline, and what our pakis
, jordan, which killed almost entirely jordanians attending a wedding. that got widespread coverage in the arab world. it's not just in iraq where people were sold what an al-qaeda-like regime would impose on the civilization. i think around the muslim world there was quite a lot of understanding of this. >> true. i was in aman i think about a month after that, and people were very upset. zarqawi's tribe disowned them, they took out page ads in the papers, full-page ads if the papers denouncing the attacks. there was a real backlash against that. you see a lot of that in a country where an attack is carried out, people usually support attacks outside the countries. >> well, they talk about benghazi, what happened in benghazi after the attack on the consulate. >> well, benghazi's very different, libya's very different because they're very supportive of the west for what they did in overthrowing gadhafi as opposed to other countries where no one asked for american aid, and no one got it, military support. but my point is, i was in, i used to live in yemen, and in yemen people were ver
several interventions with jordan and italy, and suddenly the conversation has begun. and so i think the first step in terms of going forward is doing we are doing today and begin to really put religion in government on the table. so the conversation has begun. we are planting seeds for the future but i think we have made a lot of headway with strategic dialogue. but i would hope at some point this panel and i can travel together so it's not just a government, so we have government goes with congress to a state department might go with congress, but i think at some point in future we might want to go together, so sold -- civil society and government and showed him a paradigm that has not been done before. so we are on our way. >> did you get a good shot? [laughter] >> we have a lot of questions, and time is quickly marching on. i'm going to ask you to run around. you might want to be in the center isle so we can capture the last equation and try to answer them all before we leave at noon. spent i'm from the state department. one of the things, element i think some black in the discus
, syrian/turkish border -- it's become not just for jordan or for israel or for iraq, it is real threat for regional security, and it might be one day like maybe afghanistan or yemen. it might even american interests. so we are not just blaming united states just because we are friends. it is real. i was there for maybe three times for the, you know, syrian/turkish border, and you can't imagine how much it's becoming a regional threat for the security region. the second thing i think united states has one responsibility. you're always talking about human rightses, supporting democracy, supporting kids' rights and women's rights. what about the syrians? now, i really was crying when i was seeing there are kids who didn't go to their schools for two years. and might be some of them, they might be terrorists. so my last comment is what is the -- [inaudible] if you are just going to stay in washington, -- [inaudible] i'm sure those will not be good news for united states. >> i think one of the things that we haven't heard at all here and yet should be uppermost in our minds is what went wro
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)